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January 27, 2010

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THE WRITINGS OF BAYO ADEBOWALE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY

February 14, 2009

A. THE WRITINGS OF BAYO ADEBOWALE: A BIBLIOGRAPHY:
(i) Books Published & Book Articles:1. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 1985: The Virgin – A Full-length Novel, published by Paperback Publishers, Ibadan & Bounty Press Limited, Ibadan, (1985 & 1995)

2. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 1987: Out Of His Mind – A Full-length Novel, published by Spectrum books Limited, Ibadan.

3. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 1992: Frontiers: Nigerian Short Stories (ed. Asomwan Sonnie Adagbonyin) – An Anthology of Nigerian Short Stories selected from the works of nineteen Nigerian Writers. Vide “Lonely Days” (as a short literary piece), published by Krafts Books Limited, Ibadan. 1992, pp. 49 – 55.

4. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 1996: “I Wonder,” in Poetry For Africa 2, A Poetry Anthology selected from the works of European and Nigerian Writers, (ed. Ann Berry), University of London Press Ltd., London, & Bounty Press Ltd. Ibadan 1996, p. 15.

5. BAYO ADEBOWALE:1996: “The Elephant,” in Poetry For Africa 2, A Poetry Anthology selected from the works of European and Nigerian Writers, (ed Ann Berry), University of London Press Ltd; London, & Bounty Ltd. Ibadan, 1996, p. 16

6. BAYO ADEBOWALE:1996: “The Flute,” in Poetry For Africa 2, A Poetry Anthology selected from the works of European and Nigerian Writers, (ed Ann Berry), University of London Press Ltd; London, & Bounty Ltd. Ibadan, 1996, p. 59.

7. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 1997: “Song Of the Maiden,” in Crab Orchard Review. A Journal of Creative works (A Special Issue of African, Afro-Caribbean and African-American Writing); ed. Allison Joseph, The Department of English, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, USA, Vol. 2, No. 2, Spring/Summer, 1997, p.46.

8. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 1997: “Perdition,” in Crab Orchard Review. A Journal of Creative Works (A Special Issue of African, Afro-Caribbean and African-American Writing); ed. Allison Joseph, The Department of English, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, USA, Vol. 2, No. 2, Spring/Summer, 1997, p.47.

9. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 1997: “No More,” in Crab Orchard Review. A Journal of Creative works (A Special Issue of African, Afro-Caribbean and African-American Writing); ed. Allison Joseph, The Department of English, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, USA, Vol. 2, No. 2, Spring/Summer, 1997, p.48.

10. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 2002: “Critical Introduction to Works of fifteen Nigerian Short Story Writers,” in Talent – A Collection of New Nigerian Short Stories (ed. Bayo Adebowale), Positive Press, Ibadan, pp. vi-x. Plus the fifteen Authors’ Resume, Ibid, pp.216-272.

11. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 2002: “Tanko’s Exit,” in Talent – A Collection of New Nigerian Short Stories (ed. Bayo Adebowale), Positive Press, Ibadan, 2002, pp. 1-15.

12. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 2002: “Voice of the Elder,” in Talent – A Collection of New Nigerian Short Stories (ed. Bayo Adebowale), Positive Press, Ibadan, 2002.

13. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 2002: “The New Comer,” in Talent – A Collection of New Nigerian Short Stories (ed. Bayo Adebowale), Positive Press, Ibadan, 2002, pp. 228 – 235.

14. BAYO ADEBOWALE: 2003: “Tanko’s Exit,” in A Passage to Modern Cicero, (ed. Prof. Ayo Banjo, Dr. Wale Okediran, et.al), Bookcraft Publishers, Ibadan, 2003, pp158 – 167.

(ii) Articles (Language and Literature) Published in Journals et al:
15. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The New Comer”, Horizon Journal, English Department, Univeristy of Ibadan, (ed. Matthew Umukoro et.al), March 1973, pp.40-47. and also in Life Journal (ed. Bola Aloba), November, 1973, pp.42-43.

16. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Perdition,” Index On Censorship Journal, Vol. 21 No. 9, 1992, p6. And also in African Literature Association (ALA) Journal, Vol. 19, Spring 1993, No. 2 p. 59. (Canada).

17. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “William Shakespeare and the Black Race”, in Ibadan Literary Review Journal, No. 4, April, 1974, pp. 1-9.

18. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Towards an Improvement of Audience Response and Expansion of the Nigerian Prose Fiction in English”, College Review Journal, Osun State College of Education, Ila-Orangun, 1995.

19. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Forty-Eighty Hours At Home With Niyi Osundare”, An Article on the artistic ingenuity of an African Poet Laureate – Winner of the Commonwealth Prize and the Noma Award, Published in Gists Journal, Ibadan, pp. 20-36.

20. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “In the Pockets of My Memory”, A Full-Length interview with Poet Niyi Osundare, Commissioned by and conducted for, Matatu Journal, Federal Republic of Germany, 1994.

21. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Caroline’s Choice”, Monthly Life Journal, (ed. J.K. Bolarin), Apirl, 1974, pp. 34-35.

22. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Babu’s Favourite Song”, Today’s Challenge Journal, (ed. J.K. Bolarin), April, 1974, pp. 6-11

23. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Runaway”, Monthly Life Journal (ed. Wole Olaoye), Vol. 4 No.3, March 1987, pp. 34-35.

24. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Game of Chance”, Woman’s World, (ed. Adaora Lily Ulasi), April, 1973, pp. 32-33.

25. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Her Only Son”, Woman’s World, (ed. Adaora Lily Ulasi), April, 1973, pp. 32-33.

26. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Big Quarrel”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, February, 1975, pp. 19-20.

27. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Village Hero”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, November 1974, pp. 12 & 24.

28. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Goodbye Granny”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, January, 1974, pp. 11 & 26.

29. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Looking After Daddy”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, February, 1974, pp. 11&26.

30. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Road to the Market”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, March, 1974, pp. 20 & 26.

31. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Long Wait”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, April, 1974, pp. 23 & 24.

32. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Evil Men”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, December, 1974, pp. 19.

33. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Moment of Truth”, Apollo Journal, (ed Toun Onabanjo), Lagos, January, 1975, pp. 19 & 25.

34. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “A Call to Duty”, Spear Magazine, (ed Enyina Iroha), Lagos, May/June, 1986, pp. 32 & 34.

35. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Iron Hand”, Woman’s World, (ed. Toyin Johnson), Lagos, July, 1985 pp. 26, 26 & 34.

36. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Hour of Decision”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo), Lagos, April 1972, pp. 9 & 28.

37. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Broken Melody”, Modern Woma</strong>n, (ed. Adunni Oladipo), Lagos, April 1972, pp. 9 & 28.

38. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Hour of Shame”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo), Lagos, July, 1972, p. 9: and also Modern Woman, August 1972, p.3.

39. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Misplaced Trust”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, June 1974, pp. 27-30.

40. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Conspiracy At Home”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, January 1975, pp. 30-35.

41. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Shadow Between”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, July 1975, pp. 28-29.

42. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Burden of a Secret”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, July 1974, pp. 27-30.

43. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Bleeding Heart”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, September 197, pp. 27-30.

44. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “The Guilty Mind”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, November 1975, pp. 29-30.

45. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Partners In Sorrow”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, February 1976, pp. 31 & 38.

46. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Divided Household”, Modern Woman, (ed. Adunni Oladipo, Lagos, February 1977, pp. 31 & 38.

47. BAYO ADEBOWALE: “Valley of Judgment”, Happy Home, (ed. Sam. Amuka-Pemu) Lagos, February 1975, pp. 35 – 36.

B. UNIVERSITY DISSERTATIONS ON THE WRITINGS OF BAYO ADEBOWALE:

1. “The Use of Symbolism in Bayo Adebowale’s The Virgin” – A 657 English Stylistics Research Project for the Master of Arts Degree (1991), University of Ilorin. Department of Modern European Languages, by Lawal M. Babatunde.

2. “Marital Sensibility in Bayo Adebowale’s Novels: The Virgin and Out of His Mind” – A Final Year Bachelor of Arts Degree Project (1992), University of Ilorin, Department of Modern European Languages, by Ayoola Samuel Olayiwola.

3. “A Comparative Study of the Theme of Innocence in Thomas Hardy’s Tess of The D’urberville and Bayo Adebowale’s The Virgin” – A Final Year Bachelor of Arts Degree Project (1995), University of Ilorin, Department of Modern European Languages, by Abaya A. Elukpo.

4. “A Compartive Study of the Theme of Social Realities in Bayo Adebowale’s Out of His Mind and Ngugi Wa Thiong’o’s Weep Not Child” – A Final Year Bachelor of Arts degree Project (1995), University of Ilorin, Department of Modern European Languages, by Dairo Bunmi.

5. “A Comparative Theme of Cultural Conflict in Bayo Adebowale’s The Virgin and Adeze Madu’s Broken Promise – A Final year Bachelor of Arts Degree Project (1995), University of Ilorin, Department of Modern European Languages, by Joseph Foluke.

6. “A Comparative Study of the Concept of Traditionalism and Modernism in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure and Bayo Adebowalke’s The Virgin” – A Final Year Bachelor of Arts Degree Project (1995), University of Ilorin, Department of Modern European Languages, by Odunola E. Folorunso.

7. “The Nigerian Novel – A Megaphone of It s Society: Bayo Adebowale’s Out of His Mind As A Case Study” – A Final Year Bachelor of Degree Project (1996), University of Ilorin of Modern European Languages, by Ogunyileka, G.S.

8. “Youth Response to Nigerian Prose Fiction in English: A Critical Study” – A Ph.D. Thesis (1997), University of Ilorin, Department of Modern European Languages, by Samuel Olubayo Adebowale. Bayo Adebowale’s Out of His Mind analysed and cited on several pages of the thesis.

9. “The Artistic World of Bayo Adebowale.” – A Final Year Bachelor of Arts Degree Project (1999), University of Ibadan, Department of English, by Edosa Aghedo.

10. “Socio-culrutal Ethos in Camara Laye’s The African Child and Bayo Adebowale’s The Virgin” – A Master of Arts (Literature in English) Dissertation (2006) University of Ilorin, Department of English by Kayode, Esther Bola.

C. REVIEWS OF BAYO ADEBOWALE’S CREATIVE WORKS INBOOKS AND LEARNED JOURNALS:

1. “Lexical Clues to Thematic Development in Bayo Adebowale’s The Virgin”, by Dr. Ayo Ogunsiji (of the English Department, University of Ibadan), published in Oye. Ogun State University, Department of English Journal, Vol. 12, 1991, pp. 13-20.

2. “The Creative Arts of Bayo Adebowale” – A Critical Study of Bayo Adebowale’s Writings, including fifteen of his published Short Stories and his two novels, The Virgin and Out of His Mind (120 pages), by a frontline Nigerian Journalist, Yinka Tella of the African Guardian Journal (1990)

3. “Bayo Adebowale’s The Virgin and Out of His Mind: A study of the Aesthetics of the Conflicts Between Traditionalism and Modernism,” by Professor Sam A. Adewoye (of the University of Ilorin, Modern European Languages Department) published in The African Novel – Another Evaluative View, Majab Publishers, Lagos, 1996, pp. 54 – 75.

D. PUBLISHED CRITICAL APPRAISALS OF BAYO ADEBOWALE’S NOVELS AND HIS EDITED ANTHOLOGY OF SHORT STORIES:

(i) Nigerian Novelists – Out of His Mind listed in an Annotated Bibliography of Nigerian Authors, by Professor Wendy Grisworld, University of Chicago, United States of America, published in Commonwealth Literature Journal, 1990.

(ii) “A Lasting Impression: Out of His Mind Staged to the Admiration of Literary Buffs, “Dele Ologunde, African Concord, September 1988, Vol. 2, No 33, p. 40.

(iii) Out of His Mind: Another Novel Goes on Stage” – A Review of stage adaptation of the novel, Dele Ologunde, The Guardian, August 30, 1988, p.16

(iv) “The Theatrical Beauty of a Living Prose” – A review of Out of His mind, Dele Ologunde, Daily Sketch, Thursday August 18, 1988, p.5.

(v) “Newspaper Reviews: Purpose and Intention” – An Examination of the previous review of Out of His Mind, Larry Ahmed, Nigerian Tribune, Tuesday, December 1, 1987, p.11.

(vi) “Out of His Depth” – A review of Out of His Mind, Nosa Osaigbovo, Daily Sketch, Thursday, October 8, 1987, p.5

(vii) “The Writer and His Crtics” – A Review of previous review of Out of His Mind, Tony Owogbade, Daily Sketch, Thursday, October 29, 1987, p.6.

(viii) “Osaigbovo’s Review is Biased” – A Review of previous review of Out of His Mind, Ayo Ogunsiji, Sunday Glory, October 18, 1987, p.6.

(ix) “These Qualms Apart, a Story is Fairly Told” – A Review of Out of His Mind, Bridget Annuwa Owhotu, The Guardian, Monday, October 19, 1987, p.17.

(x) “Out of His Mind” – A Review of Out of His Mind by Reviews Editor, Quality Magazine, November, 1987, Vol. 1. No. 6

(xi) “The Review of A Review” – A Review of previous reviews of Out of His Mind. Larry Ahmed. Daily Sketch. Friday, October, 23 1987 p.7

(xii) Out of His Mind” – A Review of Out Of His Mind. Joseph Dominic, Lagos Life, Thursday, October 13 – Wednesday, October 21, 1987, pp.7 & 10.

(xiii) “Loyalty Disaster” – A Reply to a Review of Out of His Mind, Nosa Osaigbovo, Daily Sketch, Tuesday, November 5, 1987, p.5

(xiv) “What A Review Is” – An Assessment of the Various Reviews of Out of His Mind S. Ayo Winjobi. Daily Sketch, Thursday, Nov,12, 1987.

(xv) “Graduate Worker Runs Out Of His Mind” – A Review of Out of His Mind, George Abana. Sunday Glory, October 11, 1987, p6

(xvi) “Out of His Mind” – A Review of Out of His Mind, Ayo Ogunsiji, Lady Love, Vol. 1 no. 10, May 6, 1988, p.27.

(xvii) “Out of His Mind – Listed in Africana Selected Recent Acquisition No. 124, December 1988, Michigan State University Africana Library, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America, p. 49.

(xviii) “Out of His M</strong>ind” – A Review of Out of His Mind, Review Editor, Monthly Life, December, 1987, p. 29.

(xix) “Out of His Mind” – A Review of Out of His Mind, George Abana, New Nigerian, Tuesday October, 27, 1987, p. 12.

(xx) Out of A Lecturer’s Mind” – A Review of Out of His Mind, Kolaso Kargbo, Prime People, Vol. 2, No. 24, November 13-19, p. 12

(xxi) “The Wages of Sin” – A Review of The Virgin, Larry Ahmed, The Punch, December 11, 1985, pp.8-9.

(xxii) “Mourning the Destruction of An Essence” – A Review of The Virgin, Ayo Ogunsiji, Messages – A Creative Journal of the Department of the English, OYSCE, Ila-Orangun, No. 111, Vol. 001, 1986, pp. 16-18

(xxiii) “Destruction of An Essence” – A Review of The Virgin, Ayo Ogunsiji, Sunday Glory, March 15, 1987, p.8

(xxiv) “Morality Among Youths Examined” – A Review of The Virgin, Larry Ahmed, The Guardian, Jan. 6, 1986 p.10.

(xxv) “The Virgin” – A Review of The Virgin, Jare Ajayi, Lady Love, Vol. 1, No. 9, April 29, 1988, p.32.

(xxvi) “The Story of A Broken Pot” – A Review of The Virgin, Same Adesua, Daily Sketch, November 28, 1985, p.5

(xxvii) “Are you A Virgin? – A Review of The Virgin, Larry Ahmed, Daily Sketch,
February 20, 1986, p 5.

(xxviii) “The Broken Pot” – A Review of The Virgin, Andrew Ehimwenma, Sunday Punch, May 17, 1987, p.1.

(xxix) “Yoruba’s Belief in Virginity” – A Review of The Virgin, Bayo Akinpelu, Sunday Glory, Noveomber 13, 1988, p.6.

(xxx) “Defiling A Virgin Culture” – A Review of The Virgin, Andrew Ehimwenma, Daily Sketch, June 18, 1987, p.5

(xxxi) “Prisms Of the Mind” – A Review of The Virgin, Biyi Odunlade, Nigerian Tribune, October 20, 1987, p.8.

(xxxii) “I am In Love with Books” – Personality Interview of the Author of The Virgin, Ebika Anthony, Daily Sketch, April 15, 1999, p. 12

(xxxiii) “The Traditional Values of Virginity” – A Review of The Virgin, Tope Abiola, Nigerian Tribune, January 9, 2001, p. 26

(xxxiv) “I Sometime Write Stark Naked” – Personality Interview of the Author of The Virgin, Sina Oladehinde, Nigerian Tribune, October 26, 2001, p.16

(xxxv) “Of Dauda, Awero and The Virgin” – A Review of The Virgin, Ebika Anthony, The Monitor, November 4, 2001, p. A8

(xxxvi) “The White Handkerchief: New Wine In Old Bottle.” – A Review of Film Adaptation of The Virgin, Demola Awoyokun, The Guardian, October 4, 2002, p. 32

(xxxvii) “Symphony of Bata Drums and Poetry” – A Write up on the Author of
The Virgin, Adebanji Adeyanju and Lekan Alao, Nigerian Tribune,
December 17, 200.

(xxxviii) “A short Harvest of intrigues’’- A Review of Talent (ed. Bayo Adebowale), Steve Ayorinde, The Comet , February 3, 2003,p 16.

(xxxix) “Exposing the Talents of A Virgin Continent”- a Review of Talent (ed. Bayo Adebowale), Akintayo Abodunrin, Nigeria Tribune, April 28, 2003, p 37.

(xl) “ A New Deal in Short Story Writing” – A Review of Talent (ed. Bayo Adebowale), Chux Ohai, Daily Independent, April 28, 2003, p E5.

(xli) “ The Handkerchief: A Quest for Self-Cultural Interrogation”- A Review of Film Adaptation of The Virgin. Demola Awoyokun, The Guardian, April 25, 2003 , p 30.

(xlii) “ Tutuola Back From Land of the Ghosts”- A Review of Talent (ed. Bayo Adebowale). Agatha Eke, The Sun , June25, 2003, p 37.

(xliii) “ I Don’t See Acting As A Career”- Personality Interview of Kabirat Kafidipe Araparegangan (On White Handkerchief – The Film Adaptation of The Virgin ) . Saturday Tribune, August 16, 2003, p .27.

(xliv) “Hunger Hardship Can Serve As Impetus to Creative Writing” – Personality Interview of Bayo Adebowale, Chux Ohai, Daily Independent, November 24, 2003 , p,E4.

(xlv) “ About Virgins and a Recurring Moral Dilemma”- A Review of The Virgin, Chux Ohai, Daily Independent, December 22, 2003, p . E3.

PUBLISHED ARTICLES ON THE PROJECTS OF BAYO ADEBOWALE:

i. “African Heritage Research Library Seeks Exchanges” – Write-up on AHRL, Stephen Arnold, African Literature Association Bulletin, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, ‘ Volume 14, Spring 1988, No. 2, p.48.

ii. “African Studies Library” – Write-up : on AHRL, Editor, American Writer (Journal of the National Writer Union), New York , USA, Vol. VIII, Issue 3,Winter 1989-90, p . 14.

iii. “The African Heritage Research Library (AHRL) – A Pioneer Center” – Write-up on AHRL, in The Black Collegian, New Orleans LA, USA, November/December 1990, p , p.5.

iv. “General News Of Interest to the Region” – Write- up AHRL , Editor, International Federation of library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Newsletter; Sao Paulo, Brazil, No 8, June 1991, p . 5.

v. “African Heritage Research Library” – Write-up on AHRL, Editor Isivivane: Journal of Letter and Arts in Africa and Diaspora, Berlin, West Germany, January, 19A91,p. 49.

vi. “African Heritage Research Library Needs Donations”- Write-up on AHRL, Editor, The Black Collegian, New Orleans, LA USA, September/October, 1991, p. 19.

vii. “I Proved Critics Wrong” – Write-up on AHRL, yinka Peter, Classique, January 27 1992, p . 9.

viii. “Roots”- Write-up on AHRL, Yinka Tella, The African Guardian Vol. 7, No. 32, August 31, 1992, p. 9.

ix. “Nigeria: The African Heritage Research Library” – Write-up On AHRL, Editors, Conexiones Journal, Michigan USA Vol. 4, No.2, November 1992,p.17.

x. “African Heritage Research Library”- Write-up on AHRL, Editors, IRED-Forum, Geneva, Switzerland, No 46, January-March, 1993, pp. 12 & 46.

xi. “Research Library Serves Rural Community” – Write-up on AHRL, Editor, African Farmer, New York, USA, October 1993, p. 55

xii. “A Dream Unfolding” – A write-up on African Heritage Research Library, AHRL, Professor Niyi Osundare, Newswatch, December 20, 1993 pp 36-37.

xiii. Heritage – A Turn In History” – Write-up on AHRL, Ngozi Abanobi-Uka, African Vision, Lagos Vol. 1 No. 13, July 24, 1995, p. 30.

xiv. “The Making of A Dream” – Write-up on AHRL, Ngozi Abanobi-Uka, African Vision, Lagos. Vol. 1 No. 13, July 24, 1995, p. 30.

xv. Forgotten In the Countryside” – Write-up on AHRL, Yomi Kassim, The Monitor, pp. xii – xiii, December 3, 1995.

xvi. Clearing House for African Culture” – Write-up on AHRL, Olayiwole Adeniji, The Guardian, November 30, 1996, p. 36.

xvii. “African Heritage Research Library: An Embattled Dream” – Write-up on AHRL, Yemi Ogunsola, Sunday Tribune, October 5, 1997, pp 9 & 11.

xviii. “Giving Africa Its Pride” – Write-up on AHRL, Tunde Aremu, The Punch, November 13, 1997, p. 28.

xix. “A Boom To Intellectual Growth” – Write-up on AHRL, Ade Ajayi, Daily Monitor, May 20, 1999, p. 14.

xx. “Slaving For the Society to be Literate” – Write-up on AHRl, Ade Ajayi, Daily Monitor, May 20, 1999, p. 14

xxi. “African Research Centre Takes Shape at Ibadan” – Write-up AHRL, Kayode Ogunbunmi, The Guardian, July 4, 1999, p.45.

xxii. “African Heritage Research Library Lives On” – Write-up on AHRL, Akinyinka Omoniyi, Itanna Searchlight, July 11, 1999, p.9.

xxiii. “Hello There, Intellectuals! This is Our Own Bethlehem” – Write-up on AHRL, Joel Ayanlola, Daily Sketch, July on AHRL, Olumide Iyanda, Tempo, November 25, 1999, p.15.

xxiv. “Study Africa in Africa” – Write-up on AHRL, Olumide Iyanda, Tempo November 25, 1999, p. 15.

xxv. “Making Africa Answer For Itself’ – Write-up on AHRL, Tunde Aremu, The Punch, December 16, 1999, p.28.

xxvi. “A Feather to His Cap” – Write-up on AHRL, Adebola Adewole & Uche Maduemesi et al, Tell Magazine, Febraruy 21, 2000, p. 50.

xxvii. “New Centre for Research Works Emerges” – Write-up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, January 28, 2000, p. 19.

xxviii. “Welcome to the Village of Books” – Write-up on AHRL, Ebika Anthony, Nigerian Tribune, February 15, 2000. p. 27.

xxix. “AHRL Extends Library Services to Schools” – Write-up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, April 21, 2000, p 19.

xxx. “On the Track of an African Heritage” – Write-up on AHRL, Akeem Lasisi, The Comet, July 28, 2000 pp 35- 36.

xxxi. “Studying Africa In Nigeria” – Write-up on AHRL, Idowu Adelusi, Sunday Tribune, August 13, 2000 p. 17.

xxxii. “Rooting For African Renaissance” – Write-up on AHRL, Joseph Musa, This Day, January 5, 2001, Vol, 7, No. 2084, p. 24.

xxxiii. “Resuscitating the African Heritage” – Write-up on AHRL, Joseph Musa, This Day, January 5, 2001, Vol. 7 No. 2084, p. 34.

xxxiv. “African Music Educators and Library Facilities” – Write-up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, February 2, 2001, pp. 18-19.

xxxv. “Oyo Governor Set to Support African Heritage Research Library” – Write-up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, April 6, 2001, p. 14.

xxxvi. “A Hidden Fountain of Knowledge” – Write-up on AHRL, Senayon S. Olaoluwa, Post Express, October 7, 2001, p. A8.

xxxvii. “Treasure House in the African Heartland” – Write-up on AHRL, Sina Oladehinde, Nigerian Tribune, January 18, 2002, p.16.

xxxviii. “AHRL Education Day Holds March 30” – Write up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, January 26, 2002, p.23.

xxxix. Culture of Reading is Going Down in Nigeria” – Write-up on AHRL, Titilayo Ogunsan, The Monitor, February 26, 2002, p. 23.

xl. “Adeyipo: A Library Grows in a Forest” – Write-up on AHRL, Akeem Lasisi, The Comet, March 6, 2002, p. 35

xli. “An Heritage for Africans’ – Write-up AHRL, Muyiwa Ojo, The Monitor, March 16, 2002, p. 5.

xlii. “I Use Pictures to Educate Illiterate People” – Write-up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, March 29, 2002 p. 18.

xliii. “AHRL Commissions African Music Auditorium” – Write-up on AHRL, Enam Obiosio, Sunday Vanguard, April 7, 2002, p. 41.

xliv. “Grassroots Education Needs Government Backing” – Write-up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, April 26, 2002, pg. 23.

xlv. “A Dose of African Heritage” – Write-up on AHRL, Yinka Fabowale, Tell Magazine, May 6, 2002, p. 15.

xlvi. “A Treasure In the Forest” – Write-up on AHRL, Augustine Avwode, Sunday Punch, July 21, 20002, pp. 23 & 25.

xlvii. “Bi Asa Ati Ise Eeyan Dudu Ko Se Ni Para Nise Ile Ikawe Wa” – Write-up on AHRL, Seye Arowolo, Alaroye Magazine, October 29, 2002, p. 23.

xlviii. “AHRL Organises Picture Education Seminar for Villagers” – Write-up on AHRL, Kehinde Adio, Nigerian Tribune, December 27, 2002, pp. 26 -27.

xlix. “Giant Stride of An African Monument” – Write-up on AHRL, Sina Oladehinde, Nigerian Tribune, January 21, 2003, p. 34.

l. “Monitoring Elections in the Village of Books” – Write-up on AHRL, Funso Iroko, Nigerian Tribune, October 28, 2003, p.35.

li. “Dance, Poetry and Carnival of Books” – Write-up on AHRL, Funso Iroko, Nigerian Tribune, October, 28, 2003, 17.

lii. “African Heritage Research Library Plans to Expand the Frontiers of Reading and Literacy” – Write-up on AHRL, Chux Ohai, Daily Independent, December 1, 2003, p. E4.

liii. “African Wealth of Knowledge Yet Undiscovered” – Write-up on AHRL, Bode Adefolu, Showbix Expo, February/March, 2004, Vol. 1, No. 3, p. 20.

liv. “Preaching the Gospel of Total Education” – Write-up on AHRL, Akeem Lasisi. The Punch, July 5, 2004, p. 13.

lv. “Three Days of Talking Poetry in Adeyipo Village” – Write-up on AHRL’s hosting of CFP members Benjamin Njoku, Sunday Vanguard, June 20, 2004.

lvi. “African Heritage Research Library (AHRL) Nigeria” in Year Book of International Organizations 2004/2005 & 2005/2006, Rue Washington 40, B-1050 Bruxelles, Belgium.

BAYO ADEBOWALE:BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

February 9, 2009

Bayo Adebowale, poet,novelist,short story writer,critic, teacher and librarian,was born in Adeyipo Village, Lagelu Local Government Area of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria, on 6th June, 1944,to a peasant farmer and traditional drummer, Alagba Ayanlade Oladipupo Akangbe Adebowale. His mother, Madam Abigael Ayannihun Atunwa Adebowale is a traditional rara chanter and dancer,who hails from the neighbouring Apon Onilu Village,Ibadan, Oyo State.

Bayo Adebowale attended St. Andrew’s Kindergarten School at Kufi I Village, and St. Andrew’s Senior Primary School, Bamgbola, Igbo-Elerin District of Ibadan, where he obtained his Grade A Primary School Leaving Certificate in December, 1955. Thereafter, he was admitted to the Local Authjority Secondary Modern School, Aperin, Ibadan, between 1956 and 1958. In 1959,he became a pupil teacher at St. Mathias Primary School, Busogboro,Oluyole Local Government Area, Ibadan. The need to be trained as a teacher took him to Ilesa where he was admitted to St Peter’s Grade III Teacher College between 1960 and 1961. He was headmaster of St. Michael’s Primary School,Eko-Ajala,near Ikirun, Osun State, from January 1962 to December 1964. He was transferred to head another school in 1965-St. Andrew’s Primary School, Ilawe,three miles from Ifon, Osun State.

In 1966, the year of Nigeria’s military coup,Bayo Adebowale gained admission to Baptist College, Ede for his Higher Elementary Grade II Teacher Training Programme, which he finished in 1967 with Merit in ten subjects, including English Language, English Literature and Music. At Baptist College, Ede, Adebowale’s creativity boomed. He was a College House Prefect, the Secretary Literary and Debating Society,and the Editor of the College magazine,The Echo . He was a voracious reader of English and African novels;an ardent reader of the works of great writers like Gerald Durrel,Rider H.Haggard,Jane Austen, Daniel Defoe,John Buchan,R.L. Stevenson,Alexandre Dumas, Charles Dickens,Cyprian Ekwensi, Chinua Achebe, Elechi Amadi, Alan Paton, Peter Abrahams and Amos Tutuola. Bayo Adebowale’s creative ebullience was kept alive as a Higher Elementary (H.E.) teacher at Baptist School, Afolabi Apasan (near Araomi Akanran)Ibadan,between d1968 and 1970 and also at Ibadan City Council Primary School, Agugu, between 1970 and 1971.

In October,1971,he was admitted to read English at the Universtiy of Ibadan, having passed his General Certificate of Education(GCE) at both the Ordinary and the Advanced levels, between 1968 and 1971. He graduated Bachelor of Arts (Hon.) English in 1974 and had his National Youth Service Corps at St. Augustine’s Teachers’ College, Lafia, Benue-Plateau State, Northern Nigeria, from July 1974 to July 1975.

Bayo Adebowale was employed as an Education Officer (English) by the Western State Public Service Commission Between August, 1975 and August 1979 when he was posted to the Government Trade Centre at Oyo as an English Instructor. But in-between, Adebowale was given admission to the University of Ibadan for his Post Graduate Diploma in Applied English Linguistics (1976) and his Master of Arts Degree in English, which he successfully completed idn December 1978. His higher educational status qualified him for employment at the Oyo State College of Education,Ilesa,where he was appointed a Lecturer I in English in September 1979. He was posted back to St. Anderew’s College(then a Campus of OYSCE Ilesa) to head the School of Arts as the Deputy Dean,in 1981. He became athe Acting Dean of the School of Arts in Oyo State College of Education,Ila-Orangun in 1987. After the creation of Osun State(out of Oyo State) in 1991,Bayo Adebowale returned to his State of origin, with other officers of Oyo State indigenes working at OYSCE Ila-Orangun and was redeployed to The Polytechnic,Ibadan where he,at various times, as a Senior Principal Lecturer,was a Head of Department, and Acting Dean, and the Deputy Rector of the Institution between 1999 and 2003. Bayo Adebowale completed his Doctor of Philosophy Programmed in Literature in English at the University of Ilorin in May,1997.

To date, Bayo Adebowale has published over one hundred short stories in magazines, journals and papers in Nigeria and abroad.He admires a lot the works of distinguished writers, in the short story genre, like Edgar Allan Poe, Guy de Maupassant, Ernest Hemingway, Somerset Maugham, Toni Morrison, Doris Lessing, O. Henry,Jack London, Stephen Crane, Judith Wright, Agnus Wilson, Chinua Achebe,Eyprian Ekwensi, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ngugi Wa Thiong’o,Ben Okri, A.G.S. Momodu, Rasheed Gbadamosi,Lekan Oyejide, Nadine Gordimer, Lekan Oyegoke and Danbudzo Marechera.

In 1972,Adebowale’s short story,”The River Goddess” won the Western State Festival of Arts Literary Competition, in Ibadan, Nigeria and in 2002,he edited a collection of new Nigerian short stories-Talent-involving the words of fifteen Nigerian writers,including those of Femi Osofisan, Wale Okediran, Akeem Lasisi,Lekan Oyegode, Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade,and Amos Tutuola. Adebowale’s short stories had appeared in important Anthologies like Frontiers:Nigerian Short Stories (1992)d;A Passage to Modern Cicero (2003) and Horizon Journal,University of Ibadan (1975). Adebowale’s short stories are collected in book form in Iron Hand,Girl About Town; and Book Me Down. His collection A New Life was published in 2006 by Bounty Press,Ibadan.

Over ninety per cent of Bayo Adebowale’s short stories have rural setting, and deal with local community people in Nigerian villages and hamlets. A common trend of culture runs through them, stretching into his poetry and his three full-length novels.

For Adebowale the so-called modern society has nothing to offer to communal African village life “except chaos, corruption and other manifestations of of western narcissim”. Africa,for Adebowale,is a passion. “The contemorarisation of the mystic of the African essence is an addiction”.

Bayo Adebowale exhaustively examines the theme of culture in his poetry. Village Harvest,his first book of poetry,bears testimony to this. All the fifty-eight poems in the collection discuss sceneries,seasons,people,places, experiences,events and beliefs of the rural community people. This same trend is discernible in his second book of poetry,A Night of Incantations; where Yoruba traditional incantations are broken into three broad categories, viz: Malevolent Incantations;Benevolent Incantations and Propitiatory Incantations. In 1992,Bayo Adebowale’s poem, “Perdition” won the Africa Prize in the Index on Censorship International Poetry Competition in London. Quite a good number of his poems have been anthologized in Poetry for Africa 2(United Kingdom),Index on Censorship Journal (United Kingdom),African Literature Association Bulletin(Canada);Poetry Drum (Nigeria) and Crab Orchard Review(United States of America).Adebowale’s latest collection of poems, African Melody (2008) gives a realistic literary repositioning of the African Continent and has been acknowledged as”deeply reseached and a compotently crafted work of art”.

Today, Bayo Adebowale is most well-known as a novelist. His first novel,The Virgin, has been adapted into two home videos under the titles of “The White Hankerchief” and later as a thirteen week National Television Serial under yet another tile- “The Narrow Path” -all by the Main Frame Film Organization of Lagos under the directorate of the ace Nigerian cinematographer-Tunde Kelani. Adebowale’s second novel,Out of His Mind has several tiimes also been adapted for the stage. Both novels have been used by researchers as final-year Long Essay Projects in Colleges of Education, and for the Bachelor of Artrs degree final-year research and for Master of Arts dissertations in Nigerian Universities. His third novel, Lonely Days is probably his most ambitious literary endeavour to date. The novel predictably deals with an important aspect of the African culture-widowhood- and has its setting, predictably also, in African rural environment. Adebowale has two other yet to be published novels:Sweetheart and Lone Voice Bayo Adebowale has been described variously as “an advocate of the grassroots people”,”a village novelist” and “a protagonist of the African culture and tradition”and “Africa’s Charles Dickens”.

His pet project, The African Heritage Research Library (at Adeyipo Village, Lagelu Local Government Area,Ibadan,Oyo State,Nigeria) is the first rural community-based African studies research library on the Continent. The objectives of the Centre are (i) to serve the educational needs of students, researchers, scholars, documentalists, and archivists in Africa and all over the world;and (ii) to serve the socio-cultural needs of the local community people:peasant farmers,local artisans, craftsmen and women in African villages and hamlets. Adebowale’s Centre at Adeyipo Village, now incorporates the cultural aspect of the life of the people with the introduction of a Music of Africa Auditorium,a Medicinal Herbs Garden and a Talking Drum Museum.
The establishment of the African Heritage Research Library and Cultural Centre (AHRLC) has helped a lot to enhance the quantity and quality of Bayo Adebowale’s literary output.The African Heritage Research Library has a formidable Board of Advisors which include eminent scholars and writers all over the world like Ngugi Wa Thiong’o,Elechi Amadi, Niyi Osundare,Bernth Lindfors,Akinwumi Isola;Femi Osofisan;Sam. A. Adewoye,Lekan Oyegoke, Tony Marinho and Niara Sudarkasa.

“FROM NOLLYWOOD TO NOLLYWEIGHT?OR REFLECTIONS ON THE POSSIBILITIES OF LITERATURE AND BURGEONING FILM INDUSTRY IN NIGERIA”BY PROF. FEMI OSOFISAN FROM AFRICULTURES.COM

May 19, 2008

from africultures.com

From Nollywood to Nollyweight ? or, Reflections on the Possibilities of Literature and the Burgeoning Film Industry in Nigeria
by Prof. Femi Osofisan
Femi Osofisan
publié le 18/07/2006

[Cet article est pour le moment disponible exclusivement en anglais] Being the text of keynote by Prof Femi Osofisan – dramatist, actor and director and lecturer at the University of Ibadan – to the 6th ITPAN FORUM, held July 6 to 8, 2006, at the Lagos Business School, Lekki, Lagos, Nigeria.

Ladies and gentlemen,
1 The first appropriate gesture I must make, on this platform, is that of gratitude. With your kind permission, I want to use this opportunity to publicly express my gratitude to the entire artist community, my friends, and all well-wishers who have so warmly and so generously rejoiced with me on the occasion of my birthday. What a wonderful world – to paraphrase the great bard – that has such good and friendly people in it !
Next, please also allow me to thank the organizers of this Forum, for the honour of being asked to give this keynote address. I am not myself, as you all know, a film maker. I am just one of your customers.
I take it therefore that, if you have asked me to give the keynote address today, it is because you want some feed-back from your audience. That is something certainly that I can offer, and I hope I will not disappoint you. My business is literature, not film. I deal with words, with the texture and architecture of the written phrase ; you with pictures and frames, the tones of light and shadow, colour and chiaroscuro. As a dramatist, I tell stories, just as you also do ; but only for the stage, and not for the screen. However, already in that magical territory of fabulation, of story-telling and myth-making, you can see where we have a meeting place and share a common interest.
This means that we should be able to work together, we writers and film-makers, as indeed we have witnessed in other countries and in other film industries. But so far this kind of collaboration has been rare in the Nigerian film industry. And it is this lapse I intend to talk about today.
2 The enormous commercial success of the contemporary film in Nigeria – at least of the genre that has come to be known as “Nollywood” – is now a familiar, if astonishing, fact.
Everywhere you care to travel, both within the country and outside our borders, the Nollywood films, you will discover, would have preceded you with their ubiquitous presence. In most African homes on the continent or in the Diaspora, the films have established themselves conspicuously as the staple diet of domestic entertainment. And in places as far distant from one another as Nouakchott or Ndjamena, Banjul or Nairobi, even the minor stars are household names. Like the icons of the football field, they adorn the covers of glamorous magazines ; their lives provide the juicy menu of the gossip journals and newspapers ; some of them are better known than many heads of state.
Such has indeed been the scintillating tale of the Nollywood adventure that even the Federal government, not normally known to accord any importance to mere artists, however gifted, startled all of us recently by coming out openly to shower encomium on the industry and its practitioners. It even talks of collaborating with them for some future projects !
This is by any consideration a most phenomenal story, for a business that began almost by accident, was sustained by expediency, and has not benefited from the support of either the political Establishment or the orthodox financial institutions. A totally homegrown industry, all that has kept it afloat and buoyant has been the fabled ingenuity of the Nigerian entrepreneur !
It will never cease to be a marvel then, the fact that a group of half-literate dramatists of the popular travelling theatre tradition, seeing their trade tottering on the brink of extinction because of the harsh economic policies of the time, could, out of desperation and entirely on their own volition, seize a hitherto neglected and subsidiary technology, and, in alliance with spare parts traders and such small-scale businessmen, harness it with such inventiveness that they have turned it into a multi-million naira business, till their products have almost completely displaced the far more sophisticated, far more technically competent products of Hollywood and Bollywood.
Without any precedent example, without recourse to foreign assistance, without the benefit of hefty budgets or of any of the dazzling gadgetry of Hollywood, the Nigerian Nollywood outstripped all its former predecessors and competitors, within the first decade of its birth, and initiated a completely novel cinematic genre. It is worth a celebration.
3 So, in the wake of these sterling achievements that it has garnered, how does one dare voice any negative criticism of the industry – “that is, without the risk of subjecting oneself voluntarily to derision or abuse from its practitioners ? Especially if one has himself never produced a single film, how can one criticize without seeming to be asking to be fed with hemlock ?
But it is a gamble nevertheless that one has to take, if only because the industry is one that has enormous implications for our people’s development. The films have been proven to exercise a tremendous impact on our people’s minds, on their ways of thinking and their habits of perception, on their attitude to the world, to work, to family, to their neighbours. The films also have significant influence on the way that others see us, and hence on the way they relate to us. We cannot but be concerned therefore about what they are saying, what attitudes they are promoting, what image of us they are projecting.
Precisely because they have deservedly won ovation everywhere, the Nollywood films have come to assume an authority over our values and our lives, such that what people see in them comes to be taken not as just a fictional projection by one imaginative consciousness, but as the true, authentic mirror of what we really are, as a veritable marker of what our society represents, and much worse, of the ideal that we aspire, or must aspire, towards.
This is where the films present us with a great dilemma, and where, in spite of our pleasure, we must take a stand in the interest of our collective survival. For we cannot but remark that, however popular the films may be, and however much in demand, the picture that the majority of them present of our world is one that we must not only interrogate, but indeed reject very strongly, if what we seek is the transformation of our society into a modern, progressive state.
I will not, as you know, be the first to make this complaint. Even our friends outside have voiced the same unease about the ambiguity of Nollywood. The common question that people ask, as you know, is – “why this unceasing preoccupation with juju, this relentless celebration of dark rituals and diabolical cults ? Practically every Nollywood director seems to have been caught in the spell – “mix a diet of grotesque murders and cacophonous chants and bizarre incantations, and smile all the way to your bank !
Then, again, those who wish to be different from the rest, who want to demonstrate the ineffectual power of juju rituals, what do they do ? They show us scenarios where the brutish African cults and priests are overpowered and devastated by the agents of Christianity ! Thus one mythology replaces another – “this time the one imported from abroad simply replaces the barbaric local variant. Tarzan is reborn, only this time in black skin, and wearing a cassock ! And it is a sign of the deep damage done to our psyche and our consciousness by decades of European proselytizing that the filmmakers themselves are blissfully unaware of the racist and cultural implications of this fare they offer to the public !
4 What I am saying is that, with all their commercial success, our films parade a number of serious deficiencies, viewed from the cultural and ideological perspectives. These have been summarized before into four broad areas, and I will rapidly recall them here, as follows : – First, is their lack of thematic profundity, of subtlety and complexity in characterization, and the repetitiousness of the scenarios ; – Second, the lack of adventurousness in the area of filmography, or is it “videography” ; with the most basic rules in such matters as costuming, lighting make-up and so on, being regularly compromised ; – Third, the promotion of superstitious habits, of the belief in miracles and witchcraft rather than in concrete, empirical extrapolations and direct physical participation in social struggle. This, ironically in spite of the fact that all the special effects they employ to conjure up their magic are achieved only with the aid of technology, with scientifically-manufactured implements ; – And the fourth, the most serious of them all, is their open promotion of cultural alienation and inferiority complex among our people, even more brazenly than the colonialists and their films did.
It is not of course that the films deliberately set out to do these things. Rather, these perceived deficiencies are due, obviously, to what one may describe as the intellectual deficit of the people involved in the profession. [Now one has to be careful here, not to appear to be patronizing these practitioners or to be undervaluing their intelligence.]
What I mean, to be more precise, is that those who provide the financial means, as well as those who conceive the scenarios for Nollywood are, for the most part, only interested in film as a fast business, as a means merely of making quick money and raking a quick profit, (just like their imported spare second-hand goos), and so can not be bothered by the larger aesthetic or ontological dimensions of film production.
This is why indeed there is most often no script available at all for the actors on most locations ; what you will get is only a scenario, or a series of scenarios, which will be verbally announced by the director or producer as a general guide for improvisation, just as in the old days of the travelling theatres.
5 Given all these problematic areas, all these cultural and philosophical anxieties, the suggestion has been made that what we need for Nollywood is a stricter and more extensive form of censorship. Some have even called for an outright ban.
But censorship is never safe nor fool-proof, nor even predictable. It is not to be trusted ; it can be a dangerous tool in the hands of dictators. Especially with our experience so far of government as terrorism in Nigerian history, it will be most careless of us to assume that the ogre of dictatorship can never rise any more to haunt us. To approve of censorship in such circumstances is to deliberately shut our eyes to danger, and help prepare the way for our own eventual subjugation.
In any case, the effect of censorship is quite often to drive the forbidden good underground, and, like cocaine, make it even more attractive to the consumers. There is such a fervent demand by our people for films that whatever they find available will be gobbled up as soon as it comes out, whatever its quality, and however much they complain afterwards about it. This compulsive appetite of our people, this uncritical and almost insatiable demand for film products should, in my opinion, be a guide about what solutions to suggest.
I want to recommend therefore that, instead of wasting our time with censorship, the line that will be more productive for us to pursue, in order to displace the deficient films from the market, is simply to embark on the production of an alternative repertoire of films, and to making sure that they are abundantly available for consumers. Now, this is where I believe that we writers can come in, as it has been done in other places. An alliance between film makers and the producers of literature is what I believe is most urgent for the necessary recuperative work that Nollywood requires, and deserves.
Our writers are not only good story-tellers, but they have proved for the most part to be story-tellers concerned not primarily with material gratification, but rather, with the overall wellbeing of the community. They entertain, but also instruct and enlighten. They propagate our cultural heritage, but without necessarily glorifying superstition or on the other hand, deliberately demonizing our local religions and customs. They have, that is, the ingredients to enrich and radicalize Nollywood, even while boosting its revenue potential. A good number of books are there on the bookshelves that can be made into profit-yielding projects on film.
Only Tunde Kelani, (and the younger less well-known Demola Aremu), have tried so far, to my knowledge, to exploit the potentials of this fruitful collaboration, but it is no exaggeration to state the immense success that TK has reaped, and is still reaping, from the venture. Almost all his films, until recently, were film adaptations of the works of Professor Akinwunmi Isola, one of our most talented writers, and they helped catapult TK to his position of eminence among the film producers.
There are two possible ways of undertaking the kind of collaboration that I am calling for. The first is to select from a number of successful books already in print, and adapt them for the screen. Here, one can suggest a few titles, apart from the already much-recycled Things Fall Apart. There are also the same author”s Arrow of God, Man of the People, or Anthills of the Savannah. From Cyprian Ekwensi, there are Jagua Nana, the sequel, Jagua Nana”s daughter, The Passport of Mallam Illia, Iska, and so on ; Elechi Amadi”s The Great Ponds ; Onuora Nzekwu”s Danda, Chukwuemeka Ike”s Toads for Supper, Wole Soyinka”s Ake, Isara, and Season of Anomy ; Saro Wiwa”s Sozaboy ; and numerous recent works by Eddie Iroh, Ifeoma Okoye, Zaynab Alkali, Ogochukwu Promise, Akachi Ezeigbo, Maik Nwosu, Okey Ndibe, Helen Oyeyemi, Tony Marinho, Chimamamba Adichie, Sefi Atta, and others.
Apart from novels, there are also very dramatic plays which could yield exciting film scripts, such as the works of Sam Ukala, Olu Obafemi, Ahmed Yerimah, Akinwunmi Isola, Bayo Faleti, Emman Nwabueze – ¦ the list is long ! Nor does the choice have to be confined to only those books written by Nigerian authors. In both East and Southern Africa alone, there are thousands of books waiting for an adventurous film maker !
The second approach I can recommend is for you to liaise with some of the established writers mentioned above, and to commission them to produce original scripts. You will be amazed by what you would generate from them, and then from others who will be inspired by them. Certainly the current bogey of thin stories and trivial or merely sensational themes, of insipid dialogue and worn verbal and lexical garbage, of dull and uninspiring plots, and so on, will become a thing of the past, if the film-makers agree to exploit this idea of collaboration with our writers.
And instead of “Nollywood”, what we will be celebrating, come next season, will be the advent of “Nollyweight !”
I thank you for your attention,
Femi Osofisan

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REVIEW OF “THE NARROW PATH” AT JAMATI.COM

May 5, 2008

FROM jamati.com

Film
Sunday, April 20, 2008

The Narrow Path
Tunde Kelani’s film deals with an extremely touchy subject

Written by Laura Adibe Photography by NGEX website

What is admirable about Nollywood film is the ability by its filmmakers to put together films on moderate budgets with quick turnarounds. Kelani’s film, done on a moderate budget, pieces together a story with a very important message. The Narrow Path deals with such issues as rape, marriage, and innocence.

Tunde Kelani’s film in which he wrote, directed, produced and even partly shot has screened in numerous festivals such as the Women of Color Arts & Film Festival and the New York African Film Festival. The film, an adaptation of Bayo Adebowale’s novel, The Virgin and a sequel to The White Handkerchief follows protagonist, Awero (Sola Asedeko) , who must choose between three suitors who wish to have her hand in marriage. Her wedding night is transformed when she must cope with a shameful secret line that places her in an awkward position between shame and honor.

May 5, 2008

from naijarules.com
1st posted on PAGES

BAYO ADEBOWALE’S GREAT AFRICAN NOVEL “THE VIRGIN” HAS BEEN MADE INTO A FILM (FOR THE SECOND TIME) BY TUNDE KELANI
FROM naijarules.com

Who stole the ‘purity’ of this innocent girl?

——————————————————————————–

By Akeem Lasisi
Published: Friday, 4 Jan 2008
Tunde Kelani’s latest film, The Narrow Path, which he adapted from Bayo Adebowale’s novel, The Virgin, takes Nollywood closer to the ideal. One query that many Nigerian films have not been able to answer borders on how appropriately they have been able to represent or portray the realities of our society. But somehow, Tunde Kelani once again cleverly answers that in The Narrow Path, one of the films that kicked off the 2007 movie season in the country. Only that – well, if observing this matters at all – the 1: 38 minutes movie takes the viewer to some 100 years back in time.

Asedeko (Awero)

The Narrow Path is the story of Awero, a village belle, who, by the virtue of her unadulterated beauty, becomes the toast of several men who want her hand in marriage. At least, three men – hunter Odejinmi, moneybags Lapade and Dauda the sex monger – persistently express their desires accordingly.

Set in Orita Village, where the mud-house home of Awero’s father, Jibosa, (played by a veteran actor, Olu Okekanye) and his wife become a sort of Mecca where men pay homage to secure the heart of their daughter, actions move to Agbede and Aku, which are Odejinmi’s and Lapade’s villages respectively.

As each of Odejinmi and Lapade push their desires to have Awero, (Sola Asedeko) they clash openly occasionally. The two rivals adopt different approaches to achieve their desires: Odejinmi exercises restraint, preaching love to Awero, while Lapade is eager to flaunt his wealth. Yet, unknown to the two, there is Dauda, the Lagos boy, who is also surreptitiously enticing the lady with ‘city gifts’ such as Saturday Night Powder, Nku Cream and a big mirror. Along the line, Dauda – played by the leader of Crown Troupe of Africa, Dauda Adefila – forces Awero to an unholy and abominable bed where he rapes her and forcefully ‘disflowers’ her. Although he runs back to Lagos immediately afterwards, it is the abominable act that fast-tracks the conflict that pushes Orita and Agbede villages to the very narrow path of war.

The forced exit of Awero’s innocence is the beginning of a suspense and dramatic irony on which the success of the film largely rests. After the Awero family has given Odejinmi a nod, the process leading to the marriage becomes swift. Odejinmi endlessly dreams about the first night – which every villager is also eager to celebrate, as is the custom – when he will go into Awero and turn her into a woman. In the months that precede the traditional wedding, however, misery, depression and nightmares have become the lot of Awero, who cannot imagine the shame that will befall her and her parents when everyone gets to know that she is ‘a broken pot’.

Although The Narrow Path centrally celebrates marital processes in the traditional Yoruba setting, Kelani configures the plot in such a manner that every aspect of it drips with a message. It is a film in which costuming and language tell a story, for instance. Awero and her friends – among whom is Kabirat Kafidipe, popularly called Arapa-re-Gagan, based on the role she played in Kelani’s Saworo Ide – tie only wrappers round their virgin bodies. They don’t wear bras, for example. Yet, the wrappers are tied so tight that the girls feel safe, thus reminding the viewer of the days of guarded innocence.

Kelani further scores a point in his casting. He parades the likes of Okekanye, Seyi Fasuyi, Eniola Olaniyan, Joke Muyiwa, Lere Paimo, Olofa Ina, Mama Rainbow and Ayo Badmus who are able to blend into the rural environment of the film. Where he needs a clownish sanitary inspector, he goes for Papa Ajasco. And where a city girl/education officials required, he goes for Bukky Wright.

It is a good thing that The Narrow Path is subtitled. But there seems to be a puzzle here. The film is rendered in English. Yet, it is sub-titled in English. It is true that Bayo Adebowale’s novel, The Virgin, which is the parent script, is in English. But even if The Narrow Path has to be in the same language, why not subtitle it in Yoruba or French?

Also, in the film, Dauda wears a dreadlock. Some may want to argue that dreadlocks were not a popular sight at the time the story is depicting.

Although The Narrow Path also scores a point in bringing out the versatility of the several ‘Yoruba’ actors and actresses who now act in the ‘English’ movie, an actor such as Badmus fails to totally escapes the cross of mannerism even in his deformed state in the movie. At some points, his gesticulations are too close to what one had seen from him in other films he had acted in.

Beyond such observations, however, The Narrow Path, despite its moderate budget and the simplicity in its setting, fulfils the ambition of any standard film in terms of the significance of its message and entertainment value.

Who stole the purity of this innocent girl?

posted by Uyiuyi, on April l,2008